Skip to main content

About your Search

20131202
20131210
STATION
CSPAN2 6
MSNBCW 6
CSPAN 3
KGO (ABC) 3
CNNW 2
KQEH (PBS) 2
KICU 1
KNTV (NBC) 1
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 1
WJLA (ABC) 1
LANGUAGE
English 30
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
live monday looking at first lady rosalin carter. >> the cia and presidential clinton library released more than 300 newly classified documents on intelligence and presidential policymaking in the bos kneian war. a look at the decisions made in the 1990s including commenteds from former president clinton, former secretary of state albright, and retired general wesley clark. >> good afternoon, everybody, and welcome to the clinton presidential center. i'm stephanie street, executive directser of the clinton foundation. thank you for attending this historic conference. this event is a first in several respects. it is the first time a president has participated in a declassification event in a presidential library and first time a presidential library opened a large collection of documents who had the automatic declassification date. it is most appropriate we are here today at the clinton center because the work in the classification area that has taken place over the last 18 years is a direct result of executive order 12958 signed by president clinton in april of 1995. today, the cia and
. >> jack quinn is the white house counsel under bill clinton. he went onto cable a lot and defended the president during a lot of his campaign finance problems during his two terms. he met ed gillespie, who was then a republican operative in green rooms. they had this green room friendship. people become friends. and in ed and jack's case, they went into business together. they started quinn gillespie, the first real major sort of bipartisan lobbying firm. >> one stop lobbying. >> one stop lobbying. you want to deal with republicans, you want to get to republicans, you go here. you want to get to democrats, you go here. they founded them so they -- their firm's founded in 2000. jack quinn got into some trouble in 2001 after he successfully lobbied bill clinton to pardon his law client, marc rich. >> fugitive. >> fugitive marc rich. there was a big to-do then. jack was big time in the barrel. he's hauled before congress. he feels like he's being looked at in restaurants. and ed gillespie said, "look, jack, in a few months everyone's going to forget about this and all they're going t
. >> -- on "the communicators." >> recently the cia and the clinton presidential library released 300 newly declassified pockets about the war in boston. john gannon spoke on a panel that included former secretary of state madeleine albright, former national security advisor sandy berger, and general wesley clark. president clinton also made remarks later in the program. it's the first time a president participated in a declassification event. >> [inaudible conversations] >> good afternoon, everyone and welcome to the clinton presidential center. i'm stephanie streett and i served as executive director of the clinton foundation. thank you for attending this historic conference. this event is a first in several respects. it is the first time a president has participated in a declassification event at a presidential library. it is the first time a presidential library has open such a large collection of documents before the 25 year automatic declassification date. it is most appropriate that we are here today at the clinton center, because much of the work and the declassification era that ha
. bush and mrs. bush. former president jimmy carter. and former president bill clinton and mrs. clinton are expected at the funeral on sunday. next sunday, the state funeral in his hometown on the eastern cape. his long-time friend and lawyer, george bizos. >> he will go down in history, i think, as the revolutionary who didn't believe in violence. >> reporter: earlier today, we had our first public sighting of winnie mandela, his former wife and partner. today will be quiet. on tuesday, the gatheri ining l the world has never seen before, as dignitaries from around the globe gather to say farewell. >> nelson mandela has a large and complicated family tree with over a dozen grandchildren. some of them opened up to reena ninan on a recent visit to south africa. she's here to tell us about it. >> reporter: 17 grandkids and three wives. everyone vying for his time and affection. there is one thing that he did from his prison cell that still brings his family comfort. set free after 27 years in prison -- >> his first steps into a new south africa. >> reporter: -- but some of his grandchildr
jimmy carter and former president bill clinton and mrs. clinton are expected at the funeral next sunday. wednesday through friday, he will lie in state in the nation's legislative capital. next sunday, the state funeral in his hometown on the eastern cape. his long-time friend and lawyer, george bizos. >> he will go down in history, i think, as the revolutionary who didn't believe in violence. >> reporter: earlier today, we had our first public sighting of winnie mandela, his former wife and partner in the dark days of apartheid. tomorrow will be quiet. on tuesday, the gathering like the world has never seen before, as dignitaries from around the globe gather to say farewell to nelson mandela. bianna? >> a week of mourning, reflection, and celebration. our thanks to you. >>> nelson mandela has a large and complicated family tree with over a dozen grandchildren. some of them opened up to reena ninan in a rare interview in south africa and she's here to tell us about it. good morning, reena. >> reporter: good morning to you, bianna. that's right. 17 grandkids and 3 wives. everyone vying f
's, it's a few minutes ago, we will show you those as well. cspanchat.ag is # bill clinton tweets i will never forget my friend madiba, the colloquial casual name for resident mandela, and a look the president has included in that suite. who tweets, a look at the apollo theater, the marquis, honors nelson mandela tonight. here's the front page of "the new york times" -- john mccain from arizona tweets rest in peace, nelson mandela, whose courage and character inspired south africa and the world. let's hear from you. greg from new york city. caller: hello. to seehe privilege nelson mandela at a harvard university -- he was given an honorary degree in 1998, and i was so moved to hear his speech. and i'm -- my heart goes out to his family today. thank you very much. host: we hope to bring you to the 1998 congressional gold medal ceremony honoring nelson mandela. from colorado springs, good evening. caller: good evening to you. i had the privilege of seeing him on his tour in africa when he was released in 1990. and hisrate his life legacy and benchmark and a father figure to the regio
w. and laura bush, former secretary of state hillary clinton, taerg eric holder, and susan rice, all on that plane. the white house said the president is working on his eulogy during the flight. other world leaders going to south africa include ban ki-moon, fran swan holaund, and david cameron. among the other dignitaries to pay their respects, bono, oprah, prince charles, former president jimmy carter, and republican senator ted cruz. a short time ago, archbishop desmond tootoo paid homage to his home in the johannesburg suburbs. >> everybody was saying we would have gone up in flames. and he was like, he really was like a magician. he really was like a magician, with a magic wand. turning us into this glorious multicolored rainbow people. >> cnn's senior international correspondent arwa damon is in johannesburg with a look at the extraordinary preparations involved ahead of tomorrow's memorial service. >> these men have been asked not to be identified for their safety. they're part of an elite task force. usually operating in secret and under cover. south africa is using its best t
obama, not for president bush, not for are president clinton, not for any president. and because senator reid, the distinguished majority leader, believed that the district judges were moving too slowly through the senate, we changed the rules this past year. we said that with district judges, once there's a cloture vote -- and remember, no why judge has ever been denied his seat because of a cloture vote. once there's a cloture vote there can only be two hours of debate, one for the minority and one for the majority. so this is a manufactured crisis. that's what was done in order to do what the democrat majority did on november 21, si which is the most stunning development in the history of the united states senate in terms of a rules change and i intend to talk about that tonight and i want through some very specific facts. not speeches, not something made up but facts. and i'm glad that the majority leader moved four district jz just because every one of the other nine might ask mr. majority leader, why did you not move my name? why are you leaving me out? because you could move it on
efforts by former presidents bill clinton and jimmy carter and the six" is kenneth bae of washington state, north korea convicted him of criminals against the state and sentenced him to 15 years of hard labor. >>> five people are without a home after a two-alarm fire in the east bay. it happened shortly after 4:00 in alameda. alameda fire officials say two unit were damaged by snoqualmie and flames. firefighters from oakland came in to help. there were no reports of injuries and no word on what started that fire. >>> there is word tonight that major league baseball told the oakland a's months ago that they can't move to san josi. the san josi mercury news reports that the letter from commissioner bud selig to a's owner lou wolf was sent in june, but only revealed this weekend. dis closure came as part of an anti-trust lawsuit of san jose against the league. wolf said that the team is still trying to relocate to the south bay. it is the first public confirmation that major league baseball opposes the a's moving to san josi. >>> san francisco police chief greg suhr says there will be more un
hillary clinton. she ended up winning that race three, four days later and shocked all of us. >> including herself. >> no, i knew that was coming all along. we were all absolutely shocked. >> except for state senator from new hampshire who told us the night before the primary that hilary was going to win and why. >> it remains one of the most shocking political upsets. we were out. we went to see hilary speak the night before. we felt sorry for her because the crowd was not responsive. all the plates in the parking lot at the national high school were from massachusetts. and we just thought boy what a terrible way to end a political career. she turned around winning. i wonder again in large part if hit to do -- she teared up but barack obama seen as coming on too strong in that debate where he made an off handed remark. >> now there's a school for that you can go to. mike allen thanks so much. >> barnacle and i especially need it. >> we're sending all of you. >> coming up the number one team in the nation facing a major challenge from an unranked but well-known basketball team. a stunner i
today, it's not affordable. >> remember hillary clinton had a plan. it was called hillary plan. was that antiwomen. remember when reagan's economic plan came forward, including david stockman was upset about it. they called it reagonomics. what about nick -- nixonan. it is reflective of the person who put their plan forward. >> was hillary care sexist? i think when obamacare was being used and a number supported it the connotation was positive. now that you have an administration with an anemic approval rating, those that are in support of the president and obamacare are sidestepping or back stepping away from the term because the connotation is no longer positive. >> if you use the term obamacare, according to her, it sounds like she's saying you're a racist. >> hop on facebook, i know you probably missed the show, and tell me if you think she's right on the money or not. >> your kids toys could contain toxic chemicals? and it's totally legal. what you need to know. >> senator ron johnson is here today. he says stop calling the president's health care law obamacare. the reason
to arrive in johannesburg early tomorrow morning. joining them will be former presidents bill clinton and george w. bush, david cameron and ban ki-moon among scores of other dignitaries. errol barnett in johannesburg for us. tomorrow is taking place in soccer city during the world cup, a huge stadium, 90,000 plus seats. given the interest and the crowds behind you now, will that be big enough to accommodate everybody? >> reporter: in a word, john, no, and that's why the government has facilitated three, count them three overthrow stadiums for people who want to attend tuesday's memorial service, plus they will be broadcasting the ceremony via livestream to 90 big screens set up all over the country. john, i'm not sure how many university football games you've been to but what's happening around me now you could compare to a battle of the bonds. over my right shoulder a south african group, over my left a nigerian group who has come here and outside nelson mandela's home where he passed away late thursday evening to add to the euphoria and celebrations here, paying respects to a man wh
-apartheid icon. former presidents george w bush, bill clinton and jimmy carter also expected to attend. george herbert walker bush will be the only living u.s. president not to attend. they will join tens of thousands of mourners at the stadium. a cockroach possessing powers to withstand harsh winter has made itself at home in new york city. home in new york city. ♪ could it be? ♪ no presents beneath the tree? ♪ ♪ wait a minute, now i see ♪ my gifts are above me ♪ that's my kind of holiday [ whistling wi ] don't worr santa will finus. ♪ [ female announcer ]his christmas, light santa'say with the hallmar santa signal ornent. only avaable at hallmark gold crown sres. ♪ i picked it out in a snap ♪ what made it genius ♪ was my camouflage wrap ♪ that's my kind of holiday pretty incredible video. take a look. it looks like an unlucky place to have parked a car in plano, texas. but it didn't happen just once. the sheets of ice and snow on rooftops got so big and heavy, mini avalanches fell to the street. take a look at some of the damage it caused. across the country, the weathe
bill clinton played the saxophone on the arsenio hall show. it ended when "the jefferysons" moved on up. racism ended when willis was adopted by richard drummond and racism ended when the iphone was available in black and white. the slip was more than fodder for jokes. it's also why the gop and modern right go to create the santa clausification of rosa parks and martin luther king jr. and other civil rights leaders. they are cast as figures with no history or context, just celebrated as the good guys who fought the forces of evil. consider the 2005 eulogy for parks from bill frist, flagged today. frisk said it was "not an intentional attempt to change a nation but a singular act aimed at restoring the dignity of the individual." and that gets it exactly wrong. rosa parks was an actual human being who was embedded in a whole bunch of institutions and organizations that were very much trying to change the nation. she was part of not just the liberal left, but the radical left. she trained at the highlander folk school in tennessitennesse legendary leftist training guard regarded as a comm
of staff. he battled with them over the issue of nuclear weapons. >> as you say, both president clinton and bobby kennedy, much better than the joint chiefs and many of the advisors. they were pragmatic, cared about politics but argue for military restraint where both the joint chiefs, people like bundy and mcnamara all state under johnson really tarnished the reputation by their performance in vietnam. why was kennedy better than his advisers sequence well, -- it's not working. i think kennedy understood he was the responsible party. and he was deeply troubled by the fact that -- and what people have forgotten, i still teach, i'm in washington and in beijing people 20 years old, they don't have a clue at this point as to how frightened and concerned people were in the '50s and 60s about the possibility, indeed, even the likelihood that there could be a nuclear war. kennedy at one point said to somebody in private, i'd rather my kids be red than dead. he never could've said that in public. but what worried him so much was the fact that the chiefs when he came into office, that local com
.10. >>> if hillary clinton decides to run for president in 2016, her path to the democratic nomination may have just become a little clearer. the "boston globe" is recording elizabeth warren put an to end speculation she might pursue the white house in the foreseeable future. at a news conference, warren pledged to serve out her term. she added, i'm not running for president. i'm working as hard as i can to be the best possible senator that i can be and to fight for the things that i promised during my campaign to fight for. >>> rob ford, well, just been a little too long since we talked about him. so we're going to talk about it. new police documents reveal toronto's mayor may have offered suspected drug dealers $5,000 and a car to keep video of him smoking crack from becoming public. the information comes from wiretaps of the gang members who discussed trying to blackmail the mayor. the report also suggests ford regularly used drugs including heroin. ford chocked up the use of crack to what he called an isolated drunken stooper. one more thing, rob ford's tv show didn't really work out. canceled a
. president bush is on his way with the first lady and former presidents bush and clinton are due to arrive to take a part that have memorial. of course, mandela believed education was the foundation for a new south africa. but 37 years protesting in soweto, apartheid is proving hard to overcome. [ cheering ] >> nelson mandela supporting and encouraging children in school. from the start of his career as an anti-apartheid activist, he placed education is the the center of the struggle. his single priority was develop the nation's education. in 197, the soweto up rising began over being forced to learn afrikaans, the language of the oppressors. noone of the students who rioted now is principal of the school. >> wlater because of they were trying to educate us and we begin to understand why the situation, why the up rising. >> reporter: here the students learn as nelson mandela, to educate black students to the level of their white counter parts, to give them purpose. >> they have struggled to fulfill mandela's vision. schools outside cape town are more typical of the problems that the system
received the congressional gold medal. president bill clinton spoke about betty ford's legacy. >> perhaps no first lady in our history with a possible exception of eleanor roosevelt has touched us in such a personal way. because i lost my mother to breast cancer, betty ford is a heroine to me. because my family has been victimized by alcohol, i know what it is like to see good people stare into the abyss of their own personal despair. i will be forever grateful for the betty ford clinic and for the millions of other people whose lives have literally been turned around and often saved. they went somewhere because she showed them it was not wrong for a good person and a strong person to be imperfect and ask for help. you gave us a gift and we thank you. [applause] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> our series first ladies continue on monday with the life and times of mrs. carter, i highly involved first lady who attended cap the members and had working lunches. she also worked on her own causes. anyfirst time r
clinton. they're both in some sense on the same side. people who were displeased with both of them wanted to see them as adversaries and in certain senses they were. so it's complicated and ongoing, and i think it is in every culture, bill the way. i think that -- it's certainly part of our legacy but citizenship is constantly -- france, other places, constantsly being reinvestigated. sorry to go on. thank you. >> could you discuss the role or lack thereof, among political opponents of compromise during the times you looked at, and how it relates to today, to political factions you see compromised equivalent to treason. >> i think that's for you. the subtitle of my book is "confidence, crisis and compromise." and one of the white motifs, one of the themes that goes through the book, is the issue of compromise, because not only do we hear about the compromise of 1820, 1850, but the actual word was constantly being ban died about and you have people shouting in the senate, or in the house of representatives, i will not compromise. or william lloyd garrison saying no compromise with slave-ho
as will former presidents george w. bush, bill clinton and jimmy carter. then mandela will lie in state for three days at the capitol in pretoria before he is laid to rest after a state funeral in his home village of qunu next sunday. alexander marquardt, abc news, johannesburg. >>> the pentagon is under fire for bypassing dozens of manufacturers and buying helicopters from russia instead. choppers are sent to afghanistan security force. pentagon officials say the russian helicopters are superior. documents show the opposite. lawmakers first expressed outrage last april. >> with all of the tens of billions of dollars we put into afghanistan, this is a tough one to justify. >> we are trying to provide them as much capability as possible so they can, in fact, take responsibility for security. >> those a.p. documents show the american-made boeing chinook helicopter was the most cost effective choice over the long haul. >>> in jacksonville, florida, a small plane crashed killing all three people on board. the cessna went down in a pond in a secluded neighborhood. the pilot radioed moments before to s
and bill clinton and george bush are on their way. mandela believed education was the foundation of a new south africa. but the legacy of apartheid is proving hard to overcome. al jazeera's feda gresse has the story. >> nelson mandela enjoying his favorite date, supporting and encouraging children in school. from the start of his career as an antiapartheid activist the statesman put education at the top of the schedule. to educate the nation's once depressed youth. in 1996, the suweto, then the language of oppression. linda molefe was one of those young students who rioted. he is now the principal of a secondary school one of suweto's most successful. he keeps eye over the classes acutely aware of the country's lessons. >> we are throwing without, knowing exactly. but later because of these little meetings or little held at night or in some corners they were trying to educate us to begin to understand why the boycott, why the situation, why the uprising. >> here as nelson mandela did, to give them both purpose and hope. the since then the anc has really struggled to fulfill nelson mandela
with the late richard holbrooke, and president clinton had just dropped off chelsea at stanford and mandela was so social. he knew everybody by name. he remembered my original interview with him. if he walked in here today, he would put everybody at ease. there wasn't any of that aura that he carried around with him. >> so charismatic. >> i knew i was in the presence of a great man. >> he was a renaissance man is how i would put it. he moved from every generation even eventually embracing aids when it wasn't popular for leaders in africa to do that. >> thank you both. appreciate your time. >> absolutely. >> we'll have more on nelson mandela and his extraordinary legacy coming up in a couple of minutes. >>> let's switch gears now. there's a big winter storm. big story. millions impacted by what could be one of the worst ice storms in years. let's get to al with the latest on it. al, good morning to you. >> good morning, guys. 1,200 miles from san angelo texas all the way into the northeast and new england. right now the heaviest concentration of snow and ice is in arkansas, oklahoma, and on
on some of the issues he brought up? >> benghazi will be a big issue for hillary clinton in particular if she runs for president. correctly thist was a country of libya the united states and benghazi in , that the united states put its military resources into to try to help and for it to turn around so quickly and become a place where an american ambassador and three others were killed, it has to be seen as a row problem for the administration and the secretary -- state of the time, hillary clinton. i do something she will have to explain repeatedly if she runs for office. >> this issue of legacy rights on twitter. -- >> i think it is fair. what has begins to look at its own legacy. the president begins to look ahead and count years and months. what does he most want to be remembered for by the time he leaves office? mind in the white house particular. i think oscar race is a good point. you cannot sum up his legacy yet, certainly. to be is important mindful of the way the presidency, his remaining time in office, and what he most wants to achieve their it >> your colleague in his piec
of icons and maybe always will be. president bill clinton, who has such a wonderful with words, said this: every time nelson mandela walks into a room, we all feel a little bigger. we all want to stand up, we all want to cheer, because we'd like to be him, like him on our best day. sadly, nelson mandela won't with walking into our rooms ever again, but we can all still strive to be like him on our best days. for as he said in one of his memorable proverbs, what counters in life is not -- counts in life is not the mere fact that we've lived, it is the difference we've made to the lives of others. >> here, here. >> mr. alistair byrd. >> thank you, mr. speaker. it's a real privilege to to follow the right honorable gentleman. he speaks with an authenticity that few others could have in these circumstances. and it must be the case the vindication of history sits comfortably on his shoulders and all those in the anti-apartheid movement, and he is entitled to his day today, and he's spoken so well of the things that matter so much to him and to so many of us. i remember as a small boy writing -
. president obama as you know, former presidents geooge w. bush as well as clinton nd carter all going to attend the memorial service alonn witt tens of late today we watched the fellow leader here to visit the family. earlier we caught up wwth a grandson of nelson mandela. check out how he is barking his >> thereeis mourniig here but there is joy. the grandson of nelson mandela here in this noisy crowd, the band playing, people are fallen leaaer but also joyful about what happened. nelson mandela spent for of his life, thhy were mournful but sleb -- celebratory. emotion we've seen the last couple of days and we've only seen the peginning of it. nelson mandela will lle in state sundayy n his home villaae about 500 miles away. a long, emotiinal wwek. back to you. indeed. thank you. jon: new claims that the real problem with obamacare is just -pbad p.r. chief obamacare architect ezekieal emmanuel saying the the administtation just has to do aabettee job getttng that pessage out. listen. >> nn oneehas aunched a bbg p.r. campaign to get these people signed up beeause of the problems with
clinton and even some of their best friends. but this is just more laughing to keep from crying. all of this was the latest example of how a country, our country, is still unable to properly discuss race, in a society increasingly forgettable about structural racism and the way it pervades our nation. we noticed the flashpoints of horror, the shooting of trayvon martin and jordan davis and remeisha mcbride. we produced outrage about the stories is like this one where a 13-year-old girl was placed in protective custody when police didn't believe the two black men when he was traveling with were her legal guardians. no, there isn't any more to that story, they were just standing, waiting for a bus when they were arrested. charges were finally dropped this week, but, listen, far too often, in our public discourse about racism, we get stuck on the individual manifestations of explicit racial bias. and while hurling the n-word may be easy to identify as racist, it might also be the least impactful act of all racism, with which we should be concerned. instead of working ourselves into a tw
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)